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The Indian Gymnastics Federation has a high quality insignia on there leos. A printed picture of the flag stuck on by cellotape. What??

The Indian Gymnastics Federation has a high quality insignia on there leos. A printed picture of the flag stuck on by cellotape. What??

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watching the commonwealth games gymnastics with my family is so hard. all they do is pause the tv and ask me questions like “what is that move” “that’s a split leap mum”. just let the commentators explain okay.okay. 

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“ New Zealand gymnast Courtney McGregor out of Commonwealth Games with knee injury ”

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Here’s to the people who say cheerleading isn’t a sport and that cheerleaders aren’t athletes. The very definition of sport is, and I quote, “an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature.” We practice just as much as you do. Every day of the week, 2+ hours. We condition, We run, We do ab workouts and pushups and planks. No, we don’t lift weights, we lift our athletes-and we hold them 10-15 feet in the air until our arms shake. Until our legs quiver. Don’t doubt the flyers either. We have more muscle than you seem to think. The amount of balance, leg muscle, and core tightness it takes to stay in the air is unbelievable to someone who has never done it before. We run full speed at nothing, then flip in the air, twist, and land on our feet. We jump. We jump high-without a trampoline. Concentrating on pointed toes, extended legs, tight arms, jump height, facials, and smiling… Ever based a basket toss? You get blood blisters on your hands. Softball sized bruises start to appear like magic. As for the flyers, if you’re not tight, expect to have your back jammed into your bases knee. Don’t forget about the backspots. We are the lifeguards of cheerleading. We save lives everyday. We get concussions, hit, and rammed into the ground. Without us, your flyers would be injured. Sprained ankles, broken fingers, and pulled muscles don’t slow us down. You practice like it doesn’t hurt. Now you have 2.5 minutes on a paneled mat. You have 1000+ people in the crowd every time you go on that floor. 4 judges. 2.5 minutes of horrendous physical activity and we make it look easy. Perfection doesnt exist, but here we go reaching for it anyways. You hit or you miss. Toes weren’t pointed? Deduction. Didn’t stick your tumbling? Deduction. Stunt didn’t hit? Deduction. You all think we’re the prissy girls who always have to have perfect hair and makeup. You’re wrong. At practice, we have messy buns and running makeup. Competitions? Sweats until we absolutely have to get ready. Do you think that cheer uniform is comfortable? It’s not… Sure the hair and make up is fun and gets us in the mood to perform, but ultimately it’s to unite us as a team. To be uniformed and have the same look. Think we don’t eat & are obsessed with being skinny? Good joke. We love food. Not all cheerleaders are mean girls who think they rule the school. We have really good grades and don’t hang out with the “cool kids” and go parties every weekend. We don’t all have starting quarterback football boyfriends or even any boyfriends at all. People see us as stereo types. Its wrong. Cheerleading is in the top 5 most dangerous sports in the world. Did you catch that? Sport. Proven to be in the Top 5 most dangerous, and you still have the nerve to say its not a sport? You’ve got to be joking. Cheerleading is something you have to want and work for. You have to love it and have a passion for it. So you doubt us? Fine. We’ll prove you wrong. Say we’re not athletes? Okay. Come to a practice. Compete with us. You’ll think differently. Say what we do is easy? Try it. I dare you.

(Source: cheer-athletics-cheetahs, via hit-hit-pull-cheer)

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A Quick Guide to Shaposhnikova Transitions and Their Actual Names

thepushyqueenofsluttown:

Recently I’ve noticed that many of the blogs & sites that cover major gymnastics events, even the most reputable ones, confuse the different shaposh variations and their names when they publish articles, quick hits, meet recaps, etc. It kind of frustrates me to read articles and quick hits on a major gymnastics news site in which the author repeatedly describes the Van Leeuwen as a “toe Khorkina II” or just gives up and starts calling all of them “shaposh” because they don’t know the actual name of the skill. I feel like if you are running a site that purports to offer accurate, comprehensive coverage of major events, you should know the proper names of skills and be able to recognize them and differentiate between them. When these bloggers and editors repeatedly misname or lump all of the transitions under the umbrella term “shaposh,” they’re misinforming viewers and readers who visit their sites to learn about the sport IMO.

ANYWAY, to combat this problem, I’m typing out a rough guide to the different types of shaposh-style transitions in hopes that you’ll be able to correctly identify these skills even when given the wrong information by commentators or bloggers. I know there was something similar to this floating around Tumblr a while ago, but the blog that published it has been deleted for quite some time, so I figured it wouldn’t hurt to make one of my own here for those who are interested. 

Shaposhnikova:  Clear hip circle on low bar with backward flight over low bar to catch high bar. The original transition - named for Soviet gymnast Natalia Shaposhnikova. D value.

Khorkina II:  Clear hip circle on low bar with flight over low bar and 1/2 turn to catch high bar. Named for Russian gymnast Svetlana Khorkina. E value.

Maloney: Toe-on circle (or pike circle, whichever you like to call it) on low bar with backward flight over low bar to catch high bar. Named for US gymnast Kristen Maloney. D value.

Van Leeuwen: Toe-on circle (pike circle) on low bar with flight over low bar and 1/2 turn to catch high bar. Named for Dutch gymnast Laura Van Leeuwen. E value. 

Seitz: Toe-on circle (pike circle) on low bar with backward flight over low bar and 1/1 twist to catch high bar. Named for German gymnast Elisabeth Seitz. E value.

Chow II: Straddled stalder circle with flight backward over low bar to catch high bar. Named for American gymnast Amy Chow. D value.

Chow 1/2: Technically an unnamed skill, but most people refer to it as the Chow 1/2. Straddled stalder circle on low bar with flight over low bar and 1/2 turn to catch high bar. E value.

Komova I: Inbar stalder on low bar with flight over low bar and 1/2 turn to catch high bar. Named for Russian gymnast Viktoria Komova. E value.

Komova II: Inbar stalder on low bar with backward flight over low bar to catch high bar. Named for Russian gymnast Viktoria Komova. E value.

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30 Day Gymternet Challenge 

Day 8: Favourite Annual Competition

P & G National Gymnastics Championships (or whatever they are called now. the sponsors change all the time and I can’t keep up)

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flowerette:

i quite like myself
slouched over a television with a broken remote,
pale skin alive with glowing colours  
at 3:33 in the morning

i think i am at my best
when i am hovered
over the kitchen sink just after dark
running hot water
over my raw fingers

i feel great
when i am sprawled across my bed
crying before i even wake up
sun pushing, unwanted,
through a dirty window

i am very happy with who i am
i say aloud in the car
all alone
while i consider driving into a tree

i am very happy with who i am 

(via lenadeluna)

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